Conferences

Conferences

SACC has offers engaging and unique conferences that include meals and tours of anthropologically relevant locations. Our smaller meetings provide a more relaxed and friendly environment to share ideas and foster lively discussions.

2014 – Burlington

2014 – Burlington

Meeting Information:

Location: Burlington, VT.
Date: April 23-26, 2014
Theme: Food for Thought: Transformative Intersections, Processes and Teaching

Call For Proposals

The Society for Anthropology in Community Colleges (SACC) is holding its 2014 annual meeting in Burlington, VT, April 23-26. The theme of the meeting is “Food for Thought: Transformative Intersections, Processes and Teaching.” Proposals for paper presentations on this any topic relating to anthropology are welcome. Of particular interest are presentations on teaching anthropology. Paper presentations are tentatively scheduled for 15 minutes. Abstracts should be no longer than 125 words and must be received no later than April 1, 2014. Make sure to include your institutional affiliation and contact information with your abstract. Abstracts should be sent to Dianne Chidester, preferably via email at [email protected] Paper abstracts, if necessary, may be sent to Dianne Chidester, Greenville Technical College, Behavioral & Social Sciences, MS 1042, P.O. Box 5616, Greenville, SC 29606-5616. Notification of acceptance or rejection of proposals will be completed by April 7, 2014. No proposal will be accepted for final inclusion in the program until the program chair receives confirmation from the AAA prior to April 7, 2014, that the conference registration fees have been paid.

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Conference Photos

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2011 – Omaha

2011 – Omaha

Meeting Information:

Location: Omaha, NE.
Date: April 6-9, 2011
Theme: Cultural Diversity in the Community College and Teaching Anthropology

Meeting Summary:

SACC’s 2011 Annual Conference took place April 6-9, 2011 at the Embassy Suites in the Old Market area of Omaha, NE.

SACC member Dianne Chidester’s eloquent summary of the Omaha meeting, organized by President Mel Johnson, that she sent to the listserve is published here:

It was a wonderful SACCfest in Omaha! Mel, you did such a terrific job of organizing and keeping us on track. As usual, SACC takes me to places that are new, interesting, and where I might not otherwise go.

The hotel was unbelievable. I think it’s the best I’ve experienced at SACCfest! We had suites, free breakfasts, and, most importantly, a free happy hour when we were back at the hotel in time.

The location of the hotel was terrific. If folks didn’t explore the gastronomic opportunities in Old Market, they really missed out. I had Omaha steaks, some of the best Persian food ever, and ate at a French Café. I heard the Italian restaurant was really good, too. I’m sorry I didn’t have more time to explore!

The keynote lecture on Using Four-Field Anthropology in Forensic Science by Melissa Connor made me realize the important role and practical application of forensic anthropology, though some of the visuals weren’t easy to look at.

The students from the University of South Dakota (Dona Davis is calling them the “SACCettes”) presented excellent papers and were fun to hang out with. I hope we didn’t scare them off!

Becky, thanks again for organizing the papers so they were all part of a cohesive whole. How do you do that? And thanks to presenters for sharing their knowledge.

The tour of the Primate Center at the Henry Doorley Zoo given by supervisor Christine Dupre was unbelievable. I can’t believe we got so close to those wonderful silverbacks. I had to stand with my hands in my pockets to keep from making contact. I doubt that I will ever get another opportunity to be that up close and personal with gorillas!

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2010 – San Francisco

2010 – San Francisco

Meeting Information:

Location: San Francisco, CA.
Date: March 17-21, 2010
Theme: SUSTAINABLE TEACHING IN THE 21ST CENTURY, CAN ANTHROPOLOGY HAVE AN IMPACT ON ENVIRONMENTAL STEWARDSHIP?

Meeting Summary:

SACC’s 2010 annual meeting took place at the Radisson Hotel Fisherman’s Wharf in San Francisco, March 17-21. President George Rodgers and fellow SACC member Jo Rainie Rodgers did an extraordinary job of not only arranging the conference but also generously and expertly preparing and sharing delicious food and drink.

SACC was honored to have Professor Laura Nader (U Cal Berkeley) as keynote speaker and AAA President Virginia Dominguez (Professor, U IL, Champaign-Urbana) as a visiting guest and conference participant. Nader is editor of The Energy Reader (Wiley-Blackwell, May 2010), and advocates emphatically that social scientists—especially anthropologists—collaborate with physical and nuclear scientists and take leadership positions in evaluating and formulating energy policies. She feels that anthropologists have the general cultural perspective so often lacking in other policy makers. She is also highly critical of current nuclear energy practices and insists that we must first solve the waste disposal problem before building more nuclear power plants.

Dominguez selected SACC as one of a number of section conferences to attend, in order to learn more about the diverse groups that comprise the AAA. She dined with us and traveled with us on our field trip that included a behind-the-scenes look at some collections of the California Academy of Sciences and the King Tut Exhibit at the De Young Museum of Art, both in Golden Gate Park. She attended SACC presentations and led a stimulating discussion with us on such topics as the goals of AAA, the goals of SACC, and the relationships between the AAA and its 38 sections.

In Ann Kaupp’s stead, Dianne Chidester presented SACC Teacher of the Year Awards to Laura Tubelle de González of San Diego Miramar College and Tad McIlwraith of Douglas College, New Westminster, BC, Canada. Nominations materials sent to The Awards Committee (Ann Kaupp, Chair, Beverly Bennett, Dianne Chidester and Nikki Ives) said that both recipients “possess sensitivity, creativity, and connectivity in teaching students of diverse backgrounds” and make “a significant difference within their respective communities.”

Lloyd Miller, SACC editor

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